Week in photos

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Bedtime discussions

Darwin is not one to go to sleep easily, particularly when she is not feeling well, which appears to be from about October on every year. The last three nights she has not given up the ghost until after 10 pm. It’s times like these that bedtime ends up being pushed back a little bit, because my poor patient self just loses it after 2 hours of “bed time” with an awake kid.

One of the things that does help her finally wind down and fall asleep is processing her day out loud. She’ll talk about who she saw, what toys she enjoyed the most, and the books she read. Tonight I was settled in reading and waiting for her to fall asleep when it happened. “Something terrible is about to happen.” Over and over. “My children, my children!” Over and over. In a dark room. From the mouth of a two year old. SO FREAKING CREEPY. Of course, almost immediately I realized she was processing something from her day (or I hoped…), so I sent out a query to MamaLee and our childcare swapper friends and asked if they knew what it was from. After about five minutes, MamaLee to the rescue: it was from a new favorite library book titled Frog Girl. It’s a great book, Darwin adores it, and apparently she’s going to be reciting the creepiest part of it for the foreseeable future!

Anyone else have good creepy toddler stories?

Sleep and other differences 

It’s been very clear from the first moment that Linnea emerged that she is a different child from her big sister. Of  course this is true, as it is true with all siblings. I know some schools of thought are not to compare kids, but I am a scientist and I love learning how things work and how things work differently. Here are some of my observations about differences so far. 

Sleep. This is the largest difference that impacts a significant part of our lives. Linnea sleeps like Darwin never has. I think in the first year Darwin slept for more than 4 hours in a row perhaps 6 times. Linnea does every night. On the other hand, Darwin regularly would nap during the day and Linnea is more hit or miss, sometimes getting by on 20 or 30 minutes three times a day. Neither option is awesome but I’d take the night sleeping any time. 

Physical milestones. Darwin didn’t miss any milestones when it came to things like holding up her head or grabbing things, crawling or walking, but she was always on the later end of the normal range and never seemed suuuuper worried about figuring anything out (until she decided she wanted to learn how to hop). Linnea, on the other hand, rolled over just past 3 months old (not counting the times on the bed around 5 weeks old). She is eager to be able to crawl, and began to scoot in a circle last week. 

Tummy time vs back time. Darwin hated. HATED. Tummy time. She would hang out on her back for short periods but any tummy time was on us, not on the floor, until she was several months old. Linnea, on the other hand, loves tummy time and is increasingly annoyed when we put her on her back. 

Constant contact. This one may not be fair, since I’m pretty sure we were never out of Darwin’s sight during her infancy, but Linnea has instant positive, enthusiastic reactions to our arrival within her line of sight, even if she’s reached a high pitched wail before we get there. I don’t remember that with Darwin at the same level. 

I think we have an introvert and am extrovert in the making. Either way, one of the best similarities between the two is how much they appear to love their sister. 

Things fall apart

Entropy took us all down a notch last week when our morning nanny share fell to pieces about three weeks in. Sparing the details, we let the nanny go this weekend and sorted out a revised childcare schedule and all is well now. But last week was hard. By Friday I was ready to (and did) spend most of the day at home, working when Darwin and Linnea were chill, and trying not to get sick. 

Childcare outside of a facility is hard. The idea of paying more than our mortgage for childcare makes me green though. Not to mention being away from Darwin for 9 hours at a time. I still see her mid day at some point even on the days when I’m not on for care. So we work it out and patch things together and draw on our community and suffer through on weeks when we have to deal with illness and exhaustion. 

Last night we drove to help my mother transport stuff for a pottery show (she’s a potter for anyone who’s looking for stunning ceramics) and I got to just play with and focus on Darwin for two hours. No other kids, no pets, no work, and no chores. I love this kid so big.